Deadly Lessons

It’s not often someone can recommend a book to an avid reader that they (a) have never heard of and (b) really enjoy reading. But that’s what happened to me with Deadly Lessons by David Russell (published by RendezVous Crime).  It’s Russell’s first, but I hope not his last. His writing is amazingly good, and his quirky sense of humour really appealed to me.  Winston Patrick is a burnt-out lawyer turned high school teacher at Sir John A. Macdonald Secondary School in Vancouver. One of his colleagues approaches him one day for legal advice regarding an accusation of a love affair between him and one of his students. Patrick is soon immersed in trying to prove his colleague’s innocense while trying to hold down his teaching job. Feelings of hatred surface among staff and students, not only for the accused, but also for Patrick for deciding to defend his friend and colleague. Add a few murders to the scene and it proves to be much more than Patrick ever thought when he accepted the offer to help. I love the descriptions and info about Vancouver that Russell writes about the city. He kind of reminds me of Barbara Fradkin in that respect.  His characters are so well written, and I hope somehow he turns this book into a series (kind of hard to imagine a lawyer turned teacher coming across many cases to defend). But I think he’s creative enough that he can pull it off. This book was a nice surprise, especially when it was handed to me and I didn’t have to go searching for it at the library or store.

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